WHY CHOOSE US?

First-time-Icon“Questions You Should Always Ask a Home Inspector”
In two words: “RISK MANAGEMENT”
The purpose of a home inspection is to inform the individual buyer of the current condition of the home.
Buying a home is the single most expensive purchase most of us will ever make. Most states require that the purchase and sales agreement have a clause allowing you the right to have the home inspected to your satisfaction or get a full refund of your deposit. Exercising this right is definitely in your best interest. The home buyer will generally have the option based upon the inspection to; opt out of the purchase, ask for repairs or credit towards repairs or a purchase price reduction.

It would seem that the importance of a good, thorough home inspection by a qualified home inspector is obvious. Never the less many home buyers do not adequately research the profession before hiring an inspector. Do your research and ask questions when hiring your home inspector. Following this simple guide should aid you in finding a well-qualified, professional home inspector. Having a good home inspection will provide you with valuable information on your prospective purchase and ultimately piece of mind going forward.

Licensing: Some states require home inspector licensing while others do not. In states that do require licensing ask for the inspectors’ FULL license number and write it down. This includes any letter type distinctions in front or in back of the number. This will help tell you if he is a fully licensed home inspector or an intern or apprentice.

Insurance: Does the home inspector carry Errors & Omissions and or liability insurance and can they provide proof of insurance upon request. Some states require insurance while others do not. Inquire as to the state insurance requirements and be sure the inspectors have the proper type and amount coverage. The minimum coverage for Washington State licensing requirement is $250,000.00.

Training: Has the inspector had formal training from a recognized training school? State regulation in the home inspection profession is relatively recent. WA State licensing requirements are rigorous. There are inspectors that are not properly licensed. Always ask for proof of your inspectors State DOL license.

Experience: This is can be a misleading qualification if the right questions are not asked. Years of experience are not as important as the total number of home inspections completed Be sure to ask how many inspections the inspector completes a year, at least 200 or over would be a good standard. It is also still important to ask overall years of experience and total number of home inspections.

Continuing Education: Even well trained, experienced home inspectors must continually update their skills and knowledge. Licensing requires a minimal amount of continuing education for inspectors to renew their license. Look for home inspectors who go beyond the necessary minimum and spend the time and money to keep their skills current.

Association Membership: Home inspectors who have made the commitment of time, training, testing and money to belong to a reputable professional home inspection society are generally more committed to doing a high quality job for their clients. But be careful, not all home inspection organizations are equal. Some ask for little or no training, knowledge or experience to become a member, while others are very rigorous in their qualifications for membership. A membership logo means little; it’s what’s behind the symbol that counts. Inquire about and research this area fully, it will provide you with great insight into the home inspectors’ abilities and dedication to performing a top notch home inspection. PHI is a proud member of InterNACHI (International Association of Certified Home Inspectors.)

The Inspection: How long does the home inspection take? As previously mentioned short inspection times mean poor quality. A thorough home inspection on an averaged sized home, (1500-2500 sq. ft.) should last 2-4 hours. Also ask if the inspector would like you to attend the home inspection. If they say no, this should alert you that something is wrong with this particular company. A good home inspector should encourage you attend the home inspection if at all possible.

The Report: This is why you hire a home inspector, to provide written detailed information about the house. The first and most important question, when and how will you receive the report? On site, within 24 hours, a week, by email, regular mail or delivered by the inspector. What type of report does the inspector use, what is the approximate length of the report, are there pictures included? Washington State DOL licensing requires the scope of work for single family home inspections adhere to a “Standards of Practice”.

Other Qualifications: Ask if the home inspector has additional certifications or licenses in services that you may need in addition to the home inspection. For instance radon testing is a very common ancillary service provided by many home inspection companies, but many inspectors are not certified or formally trained. Some states may even require certification or licensing in these services. If you are looking to have other services done be sure to ask about the inspectors’ qualifications to conduct the tests you require.

Miscellaneous Items: Some things you should confirm when calling to hire a home inspector. Be positive that the inspector that will be doing your home inspection possesses the qualifications stated by the person on the phone. This is especially important when talking with multi-inspector firms. Also will the home inspector be readily available for follow up questions.
Price: The very last question you should ask, not the first. Put quite simply, you get what you pay for. Good home inspectors demand higher prices because of experience and money invested into training to improve their skills and their business for the benefit of their clients. Remember the money you pay a good inspector is an investment. You will very likely receive back from the seller monies well in excess of the home inspection fee. Be certain to choose your inspector wisely.

Price: The very last question you should ask, not the first. Put quite simply, you get what you pay for. Good home inspectors demand higher prices because of experience and money invested into training to improve their skills and their business for the benefit of their clients. Remember the money you pay a good inspector is an investment. You will very likely receive back from the seller monies well in excess of the home inspection fee. Be certain to choose your inspector wisely.

PHI Pricing Schedule

Single Family Residential Base Fee (<2500sq.ft) $495.00

A comprehensive inspection with digital report meeting all WA State and NACHI “Standards of

Practice” criteria. The Report Summary is easy to read with best practices recommendations is response

to all deficiencies.

Pre-Purchase

Buying a home is the single most expensive purchase most of us will ever make. Most states require

that the purchase and sales agreement have a clause allowing you the right to have the home inspected to

your satisfaction or get a full refund of your deposit. Exercising this right is definitely in your best

interest. Large and costly problems may be brought to your attention before you buy the home, leaving

you in a position to renegotiate the terms of the sale or just walk away from the deal. You may prefer to

have the seller make repairs, or you may negotiate a price cut. The choice is yours. You will be in a far

more difficult position if problems are discovered after the deal is closed. Just remember: Buyer beware.

If the time allowed for the home inspection is unrealistic then insist on having it extended – 1-2 weeks

should be enough. Allow time for possible lab results.

Multi Family (2-4Plex) Starting at $495.00 + $125/add each units

A comprehensive inspection with digital report. Summary include easy to read with best practices

recommendations is response to all deficiencies. Refer to PHI Inspection report. (link)

Multi Family (4-400units) Quoted Priced on Request

Detailed report tailored to the needs of Investors/Buyers. Ask for examples of report formats and Client

referrals.

REO Streamline Inspection $375.00

This streamlined inspection report is priced and tailored to fill the need of the “Buy As Is” Bank Owned

Properties that make up a large percentage of home sales in today’s market.

You should always get a home inspection before buying a property, especially when you’re buying a

bank-owned foreclosure. In such cases, it may be impossible to find out how well the home was cared

for, or whether major damage was done right before the past owners left the property. Ask the bank how

much time you have after your initial offer to have an inspection performed, and schedule one

immediately. If it goes well, you’ll enter into the deal with peace of mind and a better idea of what

repairs you’ll have to deal with. No one wants to get buried in the “Money Pit”.

Move In Certified (Sellers Pre Listing) Inspection. $495.00

A new inspection concept tailored to the “High Profile” Pre-Listing Marketing Program. Provide a third

party unbiased opinion shows the ultimate gesture in Forthrightness. Refer to our Power Point

Presentation and links to “Move In Certified”

Benefits of a Pre-Sale Inspection

Before you put your house on the market, you may want to seriously consider the benefits of having it

inspected. Without a doubt, this is the best time for a home inspection for all involved. All too often, a

home inspection is performed as a final contingency of a sale with little time to absorb its impact. Any

reported deficiencies at this time of high emotional stress can easily be blown out of proportion causing

an overreaction and possibly the death of the deal. People are far more receptive to such deficiencies

when they are disclosed to them up front, perhaps while they are viewing the home for the first time.

The additional benefits to a seller are fewer renegotiations, less surprises, a better selling price, less

likely litigation for improper disclosure and an increased chance that a deal will close. Having a pre-sale

inspection given to a buyer does not remove the buyer’s responsibility to perform their own due

diligence and have their own inspection of the property.

New Construction $445.00

The same standards of practice for Single Family inspection apply. This inspection also includes a 1yr

end warranty inspection performed at the end of the first year of ownership at no additional charge.

Condo (One Level) $350.00

Townhouse (Multi floor) $395.00

Exterior Envelope (EIFS-LP) Base Price $295.00

Enviro (Mold/Asbestos/Lead) Base Price $495.00

Commercial Building (Office/Strip Mall/ Retail) Quoted (RFB)

10% Discount for Military / Coast Guard

5% Discount pricing applies to:

1st Time Buyers.

Law Enforcement / First Responders

Microsoft / Google / Amazon / Boeing

Seniors (60+)